ARTICLE 1

Caswell, Carniello, Tessaro, Sidorov, Dotta, Vares, Moga, Pitkanen, Millar, Bajpai, Tressoldi, Kokubo, Lake, Burns, Lehman, Baer, Rouleau, Schumacher, Juden-Kelly, Jarosek, & Ooi. (2014). Conditioning of space-time: The relationship between experimental entanglement, space-memory and consciousness. Journal of nonlocality round table series, Colloquium #4. Journal of Nonlocality 3(2), 1-54.

http://journals.sfu.ca/jnonlocality/index.php/jnonlocality/issue/view/8/showToc

 ABSTRACT: In response to the Vieques 2014 FQXi Conference on the Physics of Information (http://fqxi.org/conference/2014), this colloquium brings together over a dozen neuroscientists, physicists and medical researchers to provide a body of empirical data both supporting and extending the quantum information hypotheses recently advanced by Koch, Tononi and Tegmark.

Specifically, the evidence presented by the participants describes numerous controlled studies documenting nonlocal correlations between physical parameters of isolated living and non-living targets, as a result of operators’ mental intention, often in conjunction with changes in the target’s biophoton signatures. However, some of the results also suggest that elemental consciousness might not be a property of matter alone, as these quantum versions of panpsychism claim – but possibly a property of spacetime itself.

Although relevant clues are scarce at this point, the discussion aims to provide a stepping stone toward the better integration of quantum information theory and applicable experimental models, paving the way to a neuroscience freed from the current neuro-dogmas.

 

ARTICLE 2

Gaona, Rouleau, Caswell, Tessaro, Burke, & Schumacher (2014). Archaeoacoustic investigation of a prehistoric cave site: Frequency-dependent sound amplification and potential relevance for neurotheology. NeuroQuantology 12(4), 455-463.

http://www.neuroquantology.com/index.php/journal/article/view/772

ABSTRACT An archaeoacoustic study was recently conducted within the prehistoric cave system of El Castillo in northern Spain. With findings dating back at least 40800 years, archaeological studies of this cave have revealed the presence of prehistoric ritual activity associated with early shamanism. Simulated audio tones of varying frequencies were created and emitted from the location at which it is thought the shamans would conduct rituals within El Castillo, while the sound was simultaneously recorded from the likely location of potential observers or participants. Subsequent analysis identified a frequency-dependent amplification of recorded sound intensity for frequencies approaching the range of 100 Hz, with the greatest effect observed for 108 and 110 Hz. These results are markedly consistent with previous research of important or sacred sites which have shown significant sonic resonance features within this precise range of frequencies. Additional consideration is applied to the potential effects of 110 Hz physical stimuli on biological systems in the context of neurotheology and the associated biophysical analyses in order to demonstrate the potential importance of 110 Hz signals on religious experience and subjective states of consciousness.

 

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